The Subterranean Chamber, the Antechamber and the horizontal passageway.

Source: The Great Pyramid Passages And Chambers" Volume 1 by John and Morton Edgar, 1910


Section 5.3.1

Please ignore good old Mr. Edgar, he just needed a break in the dusty and harsh environment with poor quality of air. 
The picture is taken from the lowest part of the descending passageway. You can see the connection to the horizontal passageway leading into the Antechamber and the Subterranean Chamber. The width and the height of the horizontal passageway is smaller than the descending passageway, which is easily viewed on the picture. Please also observe the roughly cut walls, which made the dimensions of the passages difficult to measure.


Section 5.3.2

The horizontal passageway is 16,78 cubits RM long, the width is 2 1/4 remen and the height is 2 1/2 remen RM. The height is a bit smaller at the southern end when the passageway meets the Subterranean Chamber.
Let us have an overview:


Section 5.3.3

And a closer view:


Section 5.3.4

The same view with all the measured lengths in cubits:
(Please observe the lengths have been difficult to measure and the accuracy of the figures is not the best.) 


Section 5.3.5

The same with coordinates:



Section 5.3.6

Let us take a closer look on the antechamber. 

antechamberatsub-closerviewjpg
Source: The Great Pyramid Passages And Chambers" Volume 1 by John and Morton Edgar, 1910 


Section 5.3.7

Edgar called the Antechamber for a "Recess".  The width is 3 1/2 cubit RM, but the height seems to be unfinished,  the max. is 2 cubit RM. When you see the next picture, then you can better understand:
antechamberrecessiijpg

Source: The Great Pyramid Passages And Chambers" Volume 1 by John and Morton Edgar, 1910


Section 5.3.8

This picture is taken towards the northern part of the horizontal passageway and in the distant you can see the lowest part of the descending passageway. An interesting feature by all the passageways is they are squared even they are cut in the rock.  They could have chosen round or oval passageways in the rock, but they have chosen the same pattern as it appears in the masonry. 

You can clearly see that the ceiling is very rough. The walls and the floor are relatively well cut.  Another interesting point is that all chambers small as well as large are directed westward.

The next picture shows the same Antechamber but taken towards the passageway to the Subterranean Chamber.

antechamberrecessijpg

Source: The Great Pyramid Passages And Chambers" Volume 1 by John and Morton Edgar, 1910 


Section 5.3.9

Judah is standing in the Subterranean Chamber looking into the Antechamber. Again you can see the rough ceiling and a large granite block which do not belong to anything.
A theory is that the workers started here to make the Subterranean Chamber, but gave up and continued southward. I am not so sure about this explanation. The reason is there is a natural crack or fissure in the ceiling and the floor, so they had to cut away certain parts of the rock to stabilize the ceiling of safety reasons. See the picture underneath.

dsc097762jpg 
Source: The Great Pyramid Passages And Chambers" Volume 1 by John and Morton Edgar, 1910


Section 5.3.10

The length of the Subterranean Chamber seems to be slightly shorter along the eastern wall than 16 cubits RM. The height varies a lot due to rubble and an unfinished floor as you can see on the pictures below.


dsc094512jpg

Source: The Great Pyramid Passages And Chambers" Volume 1 by John and Morton Edgar, 1910


Section 5.3.11

The picture is taken from the eastern wall towards the north - eastern corner. The pit is in the middle of the picture and the two rock mounds are very clear on this picture; also the trench between the mounds. Remember this chamber has been cut out of the underground. It is amazing the workers so eagerly cut the sharp corners especially at the ceiling. The longer I study the old pictures the more I doubt the chamber is unfinished. Yes, it looks like they gave up and proceeded somewhere else, if we compare the finish of the chamber with the other chambers and passageways in the complete masonry.  But I have a peculiar feeling the mounds, the trench and the pit are made intentionally.

The next picture is taken towards the north - west corner.
northwestcornerinsubjpg

Source: The Great Pyramid Passages And Chambers" Volume 1 by John and Morton Edgar, 1910



Section 5.3.12

Behind the northern mound there is a little ridge of rock. The boy embraced it and looked at an recess in the western wall.  The purpose of the ridge and the recess is unknown.


Section 5.3.13

Underneath is a picture taken from the same position, but along the western wall towards the little northern passage with the antechamber. On the northern wall a graffiti is made by visitors. Also here you can see the cutting style so it appears like the other chambers build up of stones. 

Did they try to make an illusion so it looks like you are in the masonry and not somewhere under the masonry in the rock ? 
Imagine how it might have been to cut in the rock in a dusty and inhuman environment. My deepest respect to the ancient Egyptian workers.

thesubchambertowardsnorthjpg

Source: The Great Pyramid Passages And Chambers" Volume 1 by John and Morton Edgar, 1910


Section 5.3.14

The next picture is taken from the northern wall towards the pit and the entrance to the southern horizontal passageway.

dsc094542jpg Source: The Great Pyramid Passages And Chambers" Volume 1 by John and Morton Edgar, 1910


Section 5.3.15

The same angle, but the rubble is removed from the floor.

dsc094582jpg

 Source: The Great Pyramid Passages And Chambers" Volume 1 by John and Morton Edgar, 1910


Section 5.3.16

Underneath is a view towards the eastern wall. The photo is taken from the trench between the two mounds. A helper is in the pit and everything looks clean and nice compared to the rubble on the two mounds . 
easternwallinsubjpg

Source: The Great Pyramid Passages And Chambers" Volume 1 by John and Morton Edgar, 1910



Section 5.3.17

Top view of the Entrance, the descending passageway, the horizontal passageway and the recess (or antechamber):


Section 5.3.18

Closer look on the end of the descending passageway, the horizontal passageway and recess (or antechamber) :



Top view Descending passageway and antechamber uden ml - closer lookJPG


Section 5.3.19

Underneath an overview drawing with measures and explanations, (all lengths are in cubits RM) :

Top view Descending passageway and antechamber med ml - langt fraJPG


Section 5.3.20

And a closer look on the recess (or antechamber) with measures , (all lengths are in cubits RM) :

Top view Descending passageway and antechamber med ml - closer look on RecessJPG


Section 5.3.21

Same view, but with coordinates , (all lengths are in cubits RM) :
Top view Descending passageway and antechamber med ml og koordinater - closer look on RecessJPG


Section 5.3.22

Here is a new top view inclusive the Subterranean Chamber, I have to admit my drawing is not exact to the reality, but it is very close. Please compare with the pictures in the beginning of this section. 

Set ovenfra Subchamber Closer look uden ml med explanationsJPG


Section 5.3.23

And closer to the chamber :

Top view Descending passageway and antechamber uden ml - closest lookJPG


Section 5.3.24

The same view with measures , (all lengths are in cubits RM) :

Set ovenfra Subchamber Closer look med mlJPG


Section 5.3.25

And closer , (all lengths are in cubits RM) :

Set ovenfra Subchamber Closest look med mlJPG


Section 5.3.26

Outer and left side coordinates , (all lengths are in cubits RM) :

5326 set ovenfraPNG


Section 5.3.27

Inner coordinates, (all lengths are in cubits RM) :

Set ovenfra Subchamber Closest look med koordinaterJPG


Section 5.3.28

Top view of most of the underground passageway system:
5328 set ovenfra REV1PNG